#118 - Hospitality Meets Dan Nash - The Brand Storyteller - Hospitality Meets... with Phil Street

Episode 118

#118 - Hospitality Meets Dan Nash - The Brand Storyteller

We love a bit of storytelling on this show and so why not get someone on the show who likes a bit of that himself.

We got some time with Branding expert Dan Nash. Founder of Six Eight Agency (https://www.sixeightagency.com/) and our chat does not disappoint.

We get through:-

  • The weather
  • Moving to Margate
  • Being creative
  • Self belief
  • Being a digital Nomad
  • Discovering the food & drink passion
  • Finding your purpose
  • Self employment
  • Building the cult following
  • Making the world a better place
  • Storytelling
  • Your authentic voice
  • Asian food
  • The Lo&No category
  • Chicken Pedicures
  • Humour and Marketing
  • Building a tribe

And so much more. There's so much great content in here around brand and building your following but more than that, Dan's story is incredibly human and I think a lot of us could relate to his journey.

A huge thank you to Dan for being so open and a double thanks for ticking off another one of life's underdiscussed topics, chicken pedicures.

Enjoy!



This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

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Transcript

00:00.00

philjstreet

Hello and welcome to the next episode of hospitality meets with me Phil street today. We move into the world of branding and marketing and I'm delighted to welcome the founder of None agency and storyteller extraordinaire I am sure we will talk about that at some point. Welcome Dan Nash no problem at all how how's life.

00:18.98

Dan

Hey Phil good god great to be here. Thanks for having me life is good. So I live in Margate and I spent all year waiting for the sun to come out and now it has so life is good.

01:02.36

philjstreet

ing this on the Ninth of June:

01:20.24

Dan

And sorry that that was that that was a very british response by me as well. But but here we are so I'm in my workspace in Margate which lovely space overlooking the sea.

01:42.30

philjstreet

. Ah, and did so where where are you recording from today.

02:14.32

philjstreet

Excellent, Yeah cool. How long you been more gateway. Are you born and bred.

02:03.82

Dan

Not at all I'm London born and bred. Um and I was a classic London lockdown move I came here ah 2 you moved to two years ago came for a month just to escape for London but I wasn't i.

02:35.92

philjstreet

Ah.

02:33.38

Dan

Had'd fallen out of love for London for a while but hadn't figured out how I get out and came here for a month and so that became another month and then suddenly was out. Ah I think my answer lies here and yeah I'd be very happy ever since a very another unexpected lockdown thing to happen. But I'm very grateful for that.

03:09.82

philjstreet

Um, right.

03:23.92

philjstreet

Um, yeah, cool and that but the food scene in market as I understand it is absolutely on the move.

03:16.66

Dan

It is I mean I turn the last six months it's almost every day there's something new happening here. It's really exploded a lot. Yeah so very interesting to see where that goes.

03:46.68

philjstreet

Um, really yeah, fantastic. Yeah I've actually had our ah a previous guest on a show nataiaia Riy Rib I can't remember us pronounce. She'll kill me for that. Yeah.

03:48.70

Dan

I Barletta from Boletta. Yeah.

04:20.64

philjstreet

Yeah, yeah, um, she's so she's pretty prominent and that's down that way and I think she's got something new or might have even launched it already.

04:09.52

Dan

So yeah, no, they're just about to listen and you but just actually the next to where I live another another place. So yeah, building a little margate mini empire there. But now the Ta is great So fully supportive of that.

04:47.14

philjstreet

Brilliant Yeah, no absolutely and I apologize for getting your name wrong again. I'm sure I did that live on the show as well. Anyway, and great. Well let's go. Let's go straight to it then and and let's get into your story I mean you are the storyteller. So now it's time to tell your story and.

04:41.22

Dan

What.

05:00.72

Dan

The employee me understood how we.

05:26.84

philjstreet

So take us all the way back to the beginning of your career because as we talked about before we switched the microphone on you're kind of a late developer into hospitality making up for it now but we'll get to that but I really want to kind of understand how it was that you your your journey.

05:16.32

Dan

Are.

06:06.22

philjstreet

Your path and what what you went into and how it's brought you here so take us back to the beginning. What was the the None job that you had.

05:55.42

Dan

Sure I so I would describe my path as torturous and Dr along I But my issue I'm a creative person but I spent most of my life doing uncreative work. Um.

06:24.64

philjstreet

Ah, fair enough.

06:46.30

philjstreet

Um, right.

06:33.48

Dan

Which caused me no small amount of pain and angst but actually in the beginning some of my original jobs were around storytelling I worked for a film production company I worked in Tv theater and 1 of the first the days of like 1 of the none youtubes before dial-up I saw you. Before the broadband when it was dial up and I think a lot of the issue around I I was in these great opportunities. But I didn't have enough self-belief at the time as well and a beloved believe that you also so you could make a career out of being creative. So.

07:29.26

philjstreet

Um, 5 words? yeah.

07:46.64

philjstreet

Um, right.

07:43.94

Dan

Sort of fast forward a few years I spent a lot of time doing marketing stuff in the music business but a sort of content and mobile phones were exploding and the iphone came out and then the last sort of stop on that slightly unfulfilling journey was I was head of marketing for Napster which sounds great and it was an interesting job. But again I was. Even more responsibility of uncreated marketing stuff. Um, so that's sort of.

08:45.16

philjstreet

Right? So it's more about process as opposed to actually using that creative side of your brain.

08:42.14

Dan

Yeah, and all the stuff you know Seo and ads and user experience and web design which is all fine and I was forced to get good at it. But it just you know there was the definite emptiness and the big changing point for me was I got made redundant and. Was persuaded by my friends who have started to have children then that I needed to go traveling and because and which was great advice that I still thank them for so I was meant to go traveling for two months I ended up going for None ars started exploring the digital nomad life I ended up finished up in Thailand.

09:58.80

philjstreet

Um, wow.

09:54.22

Dan

I would say logie trying and failing to be a digital nomad if I'm going to be honest so I bought a lot of that stuff from before. Let's say a lot of that limiting Beliefs and and all that crap in your head that gets worse and the older do you get? and so even though I you know often I was in Paradise um.

10:18.14

philjstreet

Um, okay.

10:33.90

Dan

Living quite an amazing life. But I was still this emptiness from not realized not fulfilling my potential and not doing enough creative stuff but where things changed for me was I was surrounded by all these amazing people who traveling the world who built. Making good money but building businesses. They they fit their work around their life and it built businesses around their passions and who they were and suddenly it just it made it very real for me was that actually you can't have the life of your dreams but there's things you need to do and then that inspired me to.

11:47.56

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

11:42.72

Dan

I Can come onto this I food food restaurants have always been a a massive passion of my you know, kind of did the great thing of if I had my time again I would I would have that would have been involved from the get-go um and but it inspired me to then go and do what I love and I was again I was getting oh I couldn't.

12:20.80

philjstreet

Um, right.

12:18.00

Dan

I wouldn't recommend this to other people to wait so long that you'll get so frustrated that you just think right? I just have to because I can't go another minute without following my passion and and so I made it the hard decision then to come back to London and try and break it into the hospitality business.

13:13.00

philjstreet

So that was more about then. At this point you're you're I suppose having the opportunity to combine 2 passions, 1 food and drink and 2 Obviously your your marketing creative brain.

12:55.74

Dan

Um, yeah.

13:06.62

Dan

I agree and.

13:47.12

philjstreet

Um, around that as well. So um, it's funny. You know that we talk to a lot of people about how some people come late to the thing that they're supposed to do and some people like know from the age of you know, 14 this is the thing for me. Um, and and I'm doing I've had both types on on the show.

13:28.36

Dan

And.

14:25.74

philjstreet

Um, and I suppose it demonstrates to the wider world I hope is that it doesn't really matter when you find it, you know as long as as long as you if you're like in your situation you were unfulfilled as long as you recognize that and you are willing to do something about it then it's it's never too late. As it were because you're still a young man.

14:50.54

Dan

Ijier Sit ah well like venzor Now your definition of that I have still got a bit of thought you know there's stood a bit of life left in the bit of life left there and what I hope it does inspire some people because it's always that thing that if I knew what I knew Now. Um. And I think for me is when I look back on it. It's I call it being a hater when you look at other people doing these things and you think I can do better than that. But you don't and actually what I've learned is if you deep down feel that you could do that thing and you could do better than you probably could. But then the issue is it will take years and you've got to eat a lot of crap to get there on the way.

15:55.58

philjstreet

Um, right.

16:08.60

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

16:03.66

Dan

But um, that was a big learning for me as well.

16:24.48

philjstreet

Yeah, and and also I suppose as well for in your situation having to shake off the the limiting beliefs I mean that's quite a deep rooted thing right? that you can't just click something sometimes it takes years to kind of shake that off sometimes an event your shakes the the the.

16:24.60

Dan

Um, honor.

17:03.96

philjstreet

The ground beneath you in your case, What was it an event or was it um, was it just a series of just being frustrated for far too long.

17:05.22

Dan

That's a good.. It's a good question. Um, it's definitely a process I said it's still ongoing and actually what I've learned is it's a never ending series of doing uncomfortable things and the more uncomfortable stuff you do and the more you put yourself out there as hard as it is. Grow that little bit more every time and I'd say sort of for my earlier life I just didn't I took the short term avoiding pain approach and this time and I've been winning and you know and having to get help and business coaches and communities and whatever accountability but getting pushed to do. That to do those hard things and it so it definitely didn't happen overnight. Um, yeah and I'd.

18:43.44

philjstreet

Yeah, and tough tough as well I suppose in in your circumstance because it is your own thing and so you're None of all accountable to yourself. Um, if you don't get up and do it. Nobody else is going to do it.

18:51.84

Dan

I have.

19:13.76

philjstreet

As it were but sometimes that can be a ah really really daunting thing especially when you start out on your own about you. You become master of well you have to become master of everything and on day one You're not master of everything at all. Are you? That's the comfort zone thing again, you've got to keep. Stretching that to to get to the position where you feel like you've got a handle on most things.

19:40.24

Dan

Yeah, no totally. And um I mean just a final thing on that is I would also say the difference from doing a lot of unfulfilling work and the effect that had on me and now even though launching this current incarnation of my business has probably been the hardest most challenging thing I've done. From all of this is the difference in motivation when you are None behind and into what you're doing you know so this is for me. This is the none time that I like I will be broken homeless trying to make this work. You know that's how much I believe in it and it's amazing. How what? you're willing to then.

20:58.42

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

20:50.80

Dan

Do and do those harder things. Um, yeah that that that but an interesting thing again that I'd wish I'd known a little bit earlier but there you go.

21:12.64

philjstreet

Um, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, so you're you're now doing something that sings to you? Um, so tell us a bit about. Your your company your focus and kind of what what your your successes have been so far.

21:28.34

Dan

Sure so I help um I hope but I call them obsessive food brands and these are brands who want to make more impact on their community beyond just the product they sell and what I do is help them turn their customers into a cult following because I believe that you can. Make the world a better place and make more money and they can go hand-in hand and to to do this over the years I've developed I called it. My cult brand system which is a very unique framework based on my experiences and my frustrations with the other solutions I saw out there and that lets anyone well not I mean anyone. That's really the once that wants that.

22:27.78

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

22:43.46

Dan

And to get more love from their customers and stand out from the competition and make the world A better place based on based on who you are and and your values.

23:15.74

philjstreet

Yeah, yeah, Well I mean that's the thing about business right? there I think for a long time. There. It felt like it was just about it was Profit Profit Profit and I've talked about this on the show before as well that obviously a profit is massively important in business. But. If. That's the driver for doing it then your drivers are wrong. The profit should be the outcome of doing everything else to the best of your ability.

23:54.22

Dan

s that I think it was between:

25:19.20

philjstreet

Um, right? yeah.

25:03.24

Dan

And for me, that's that that really just says it all you know I know that it's you know it's hard work to be a B core and but again you can make money and make the world a better place and they actually kind of work work work together rather than against each other.

25:39.20

philjstreet

Yeah, it's about taking the long-term view right? The um I had Danny pecael on who ah was is the chief exec of exclusive hotels. They became the first hotel company in the Uk to get bcorp status and he talked about this perception.

25:42.74

Dan

Please.

26:17.88

philjstreet

Around the fact that to to do something like that to do something for the greater Good is expensive and whilst the short-term view of that might be yes, you might have to spend a little bit extra money on X Y Z here. Actually what you're going to see in the medium to long-term.

26:19.96

Dan

Um, and.

26:52.44

philjstreet

And you've just demonstrated that with the stats that you you kind of said as well is that actually you'll see much better growth and it stands to reason right? that as you said quite rightly I'd work in recruitment and we have a recruitment crisis at the moment. And part of that for me is about.. There's a disconnect between us understanding what the workforce want from their role and then actually implementing what they want and part of that. Ah, the generation's coming through now as you say are very much centered around what are you doing to save the planet. Or what are you doing to make your community better or what are you doing to just make the world. A better place. Um, and um, if you don't get on board with that then you're going to get left behind pretty quickly at a thought.

28:04.26

Dan

Yeah, yeah, a hundred percent and know that's all I always say what would happen if an exactly the same business open next door to you tomorrow. How are you gonna protect yourself. You know and that's probably and that's one of the best ways that you can to be honest, yeah because because otherwise if a business does come and open and does do those things they going is still.

28:47.74

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

28:43.24

Dan

You know that young that though all those younger generations just instantly.

29:08.54

philjstreet

Yeah, absolutely. So um, we talked about the fact that you're a storyteller extraordinaire I mean I'd I'd follow a lot of your stuff and you do talk about the importance of this a lot without kind of I suppose. Ah.

29:02.34

Dan

If and.

29:12.90

Dan

I.

29:40.96

philjstreet

Giving away all your deepest darkest darkest secrets as to somebody why somebody would come and retain your services to to help them. Why is storytelling for you So important.

29:42.88

Dan

Again as I said it's not for everyone. It's got to be for people that do actually have a story and just to clarify because as much as I love working in brand. There's a lot of jargon and Bs around all these tubs and storytelling and strategies. So for me. Brand storytelling and telling a story is everything you do and everything you say to shape. People's perceptions of you. So just just to clarify because often a lot of people think storytelling is this whole once upon a time there was a founder It's definitely a part of it that you can't you can't build a whole communication strategy. You're just telling.

31:01.16

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

30:53.50

Dan

But end the stories as much as other people might tell you that that's what you need to do? Um, so yeah, so it's just yeah, so storytelling is shaping. People's perceptions and also doing things so you're not just talking about them and it's just because ultimately it's to build that but emotional connection like I could drown you in stats. Of of how what the when customers emotionally connect to a brand all the benefits that brings to a brand. They are so more likely to buy from you so more likely to buy um to open new revenue streams to anything you have to sell so much more likely to defend and protect you so much more likely to recommend you to others like the average. Millennial shares their positive experience with up to None people they say um, but then imagine if you but the more you can share your stories. So. It's also making people look good because you can say I had a great meal. But oh I had a great meal but these guys are aiming to do None waste and they look after their team and they're really into um. Asian food you know and then suddenly then those bits of the story start diffusing out as well. So you can control you. You have an element of control over what it says but really ultimately it just comes down to the bedrock for any business is loyal users is is your law customers. That's what sustainable growth is built on and your story is a key way to get that emotional connection. So they stay with you for life rather than moving to someone else that stands for more of their values again. Just so I love that so in others that they said of people that leave from people that leave left a brand.

33:58.74

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

33:50.00

Dan

Um, why did you do it? 90% said because the other brand shared their their outlook and values are more in line with me so you know for those that think it's just about the product I'm sorry to say it's it's ahead of a lot more than that.

34:27.15

philjstreet

Yeah, yeah, Don know but I definitely don't be sorry for saying that because I think it's um, it's absolutely critical and I think I actually saw one of your your posts I facts it might have been today. You did you run? ah as webinar or something like that ah around a brand.

34:30.60

Dan

And.

34:45.48

Dan

The coffee brands.

35:06.16

philjstreet

Had ah used its authentic voice to build um the the following basically and then um, they they became ah a legit company because they'd kind of made it and the tone completely changed and and as a result of that started to disconnect a little bit from the the people that did. Worked so hard to to get in the None place.

35:28.44

Dan

Yeah, our thank thanks for reading that post I Just thought it was really interesting and I keep I honestly hear this again and again for every independent founder that started to scale their business where they say that suddenly. After they start opening a few sites. It's suddenly there's this pressure that we have to use corporate voice and we have to remove all the personality. The whole reason that people came to you in the None place. Um, and but just by and that's but for converse with it to actually then suddenly just. They keep doing that they they're killing all that good work and actually ah gonna Plateau and if this might my but I guess the biggest principle I have is that everyone should run their pages like it was their personal page which I know isn't always possible but that is a driving principle as it. It should be as close to your personal page. If you want to get results if you want to get results with that time and money you're putting it? Um, but it's just it's interesting because to launch a food business talking about doing uncomfortable things means doing so many hard uncomfortable things to to run a food business. But then when it comes to communicating people side. They just freeze up and it's suddenly they have this block you know where the wear but and I know it's a very human thing and I'm sure there's deep psychological reasons for it. But yeah, it's Amazing. How many people and you know people have built these incredible businesses with a great story then suddenly start freezing up when it comes up to. Sharing this and also people are gagging to hear it people want to know about this and will really want to support you and your brand like the these community you you've spent so long building this love from putting your heart and soul into and it's yeah I do anyway my mission to change that so I can talk about this forever. But.

38:57.62

philjstreet

Yeah, no, that's awesome though that I think a lot more people and especially within the world of kind of founder led businesses I'm in a founder led business myself. So and you know you you have to have you have to wear many many hats and especially when you're um I suppose on the None hand you want to. Entice people to come use your product service. Whatever on the other hand you have to maintain reputation so that I suppose can can lead to confusion a little bit but around what that voice should sound like because if you're being too familiar perhaps in the tone of your languaging through marketing does that then come across as.

39:56.00

Dan

When.

40:15.42

philjstreet

You're not serious when it comes to the the business side of stuff. But I think that from what I'm hearing and certainly from that post you you put this morning. It's It's definitely just about maintaining authenticity maintaining who you are as ah as a human and what you stand for. And therefore what your business stands for as are because it's usually an extension of of the values of the of the Founder. So just make sure that you're kind of always being true to that.

40:38.80

Dan

Um, yeah.

40:50.92

Dan

Yeah, yeah, me use some that are very well I would say people buy your process not the product and by the process is everything that goes that that every single thing you know if you're going to restaurant every single aspect that went into shaping that plate of food From. Kitchen you did stars in into the podcasts you listened to to the chefs that mentored you to you know,? whatever the magazines you read the may have or may not have anything to do with food every single one of those no one could copy that and that all influences because food is creativity and to create a process creativity comes from everywhere. Share it because people want to know about it.

42:21.54

philjstreet

Yeah, yeah, yeah, awesome. So and you mentioned on your website I believe let me just I've written this down because I thought this was really cool and you're the founder of six Eight southeast asian food geek. So.

42:29.62

Dan

Ah.

42:54.84

philjstreet

I'm guessing that that came from your traveling because that's you, you're in that area weren't you.

42:39.72

Dan

It. It's a good guess it goes it. Yeah I was I lived in loon then I lived in Thailand and I traveled a lot around the area that took my love to the next level but actually it goes a lot. Um, it goes a lot earlier than that. So um. I mean. Food's always been in in my but my grandma had a restaurant and then my parents love chinese food they met at a chinese restaurant in Chinatown which is a great origin story for me because actually agent food asian food is such a part of my sort of personal brand like I've just did brace. Yeah, it really is um and a uni.

43:51.60

philjstreet

Um, fantastic because actually part of your story. Yeah.

43:56.36

Dan

I remember that just because we see a lot of chinese food I missed it and I learned to sort of recreate these dishes to quite a high level and and actually just not just but beyond because I have worked on my own story. So what's really interesting is my grandma used to Salt Muke everything with salt. My mom eats. With like None hand with the spoon and the other hand the salt pour it pouring the salt into it and she carries a aromat sort of swiss msg powder because salt doesn't give her the hitch she needs and I have this very extensive soy source collection because it's as salt as condiment that there is so there's actually an interesting line taking me all to that.

45:15.40

philjstreet

Um, right.

45:05.34

Dan

All the way through there. Um, but then of course living in Southeast Asia took that to a whole other dimension and um, it's pretty. It's it's all I cook and I even I've started up an asian cooking club here in margates. So yeah, like another thing I could talk about like in great detail. People's eyes rolling to the back of their heads.

45:55.18

philjstreet

Fantastical. Yeah, but you know then that but it just must then give you that extra level of passion to believe in what you're doing because you obviously clearly care about food and okay, specifically more about Asian food because it plays such a massive part in your life. But.

46:03.28

Dan

And.

46:30.40

philjstreet

But nevertheless you know food just and and it's ah who who out there has not been traveling who even likes just that your food a little bit wouldn't class themselves as a monster foodie but who doesn't love to go to the little local restaurant and just uncover your and um.

46:17.96

Dan

Are.

46:30.94

Dan

She.

47:06.24

philjstreet

Uncover an absolute gem of a place whether that's street food or restaurant or whatever but something that's that's just really, really cool and that's to me one of the reasons why I'd love hospitality because it's the traveling element. It's just there. It's part. It's part of the makeup of the the restaurant and even if you operate a series of restaurants that are local to wherever you were born and brought up up and I guarantee you when you go traveling you pick up ideas you pick up new things that you see that actually that would work well in my business traveling for me is essential. Like ah the last the two years bit of preceded as where we were um, a little locked down um off god I was so so happy to get traveling again last year

48:18.14

Dan

Yeah I Then it sounds out with the same because that the for me the greatest thrill in the world is just finding that when you're having that tiny little spot where it's just full of locals. That's totally off the grid and they do something incredible and it just costs a few quiz and that those are like my best memories. Yeah.

48:57.44

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

49:08.32

philjstreet

Yeah, absolutely excellent. So um, what's what have you got your head in at the moment in terms of what's so what's 6 it up to.

49:07.84

Dan

So at the moment I mean just just just plugging away I am speaking to more I've just done a project with ooey vegan who're an amazing vegan brand and I'm finding the vegan actually an alcohol free space. Very interesting at the moment and I just find it just purely as a. Someone who's fascinated by food just this whole creative process about how you try and recreate these tastes just to buy through innovation and just through really interesting processes is really interesting to me but then in doing some of the research on this project I Just found that So One of my I said my mission is to help. People with amazing Stories. Do a better job of it and I'm known just particularly with vegan brands where your customers really passionate really care who they buy from really care what they put into their bodies and I've just seen so many vegan brands doing such a bad job of communicating this and building the community around it when really. This I mean if they if if anyway if there's any that's sorry I Just get my words out I mean there is no more passionate community than the plant-based Vegan Community. So I'm just having a lot of conversations around that and and alcohol free as well because someone who likes to like a drink alcohol free changed my life a bit Really I'd say it's really helped me.

51:34.74

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

51:38.74

Dan

Massively reduce my alcohol alcohol consumption and again I Just find it very exciting and innovative. Um, so that and and yeah and I'm looking to hire because I've learned the hard way as a creative you try and do all on your own. You think that hiring will make life more difficult but I've learned the very hard way that I cannot. Because I want to start launching courses as why but launch some pilot courses recently I I love teaching and again helping independents and smaller people who can't afford my services to to share their story too. But it all comes back to getting help So That's my challenge of the money. Yeah, and.

52:58.10

philjstreet

Yeah, well, ah, do you live in land right? The um, the and if you're if you're getting busy and and busier then that obviously but makes sense but I absolutely hear you on um the the low and no category in drinks is just on such a mon trajectory.

52:57.52

Dan

Are.

53:15.40

Dan

Um, and.

53:37.28

philjstreet

The theory behind this is that the um, the next generation coming through are not drinking basically or certainly not to level that you and I might have done when we were eighteen years old um and um and as a result as you say people are having to innovate in that space and actually.

53:37.68

Dan

Sports.

54:14.88

philjstreet

This drink that I'm drinking today is is a fermented tea. Um, yeah and I um I wouldn't five years ago not that I'd been sat here drinking a beer right now but the um ah that halfpast four in the afternoon in a sun's out and but ah yeah, it's just.

54:00.20

Dan

Nice, yeah.

54:15.78

Dan

Um, yeah, nothing wrong with that.

54:53.32

philjstreet

It makes sense right? My wife and I always talked about the fact that our generation used to look at the generation before us who were so massively and you know smokers and we used to look at them and go you know how stupid were they the generation now I think we always then talked about people would look at the same view as sugar and think how stupid were we to. You'll be so sugar-orientated for so long. But now we're in a situation whereby it's it's alcohol right? is the people are looking at it going why you put in this thing in your body when you know there's ah, a healthier option out there.

55:37.72

Dan

Yeah now now a hundred percent it's bit it's exciting and I think kind of making the world. Yeah I think makes well better people. Don't need to especially english people. We don't need to be with that drunk all the time it doesn't it doesn't help us.

56:14.78

philjstreet

No, no one did certainly we need. Ah we need to strengthen our reputation overseas at the moment not not weak and that's the story for another day I think and from your career so far your travels have you got any.

56:06.18

Dan

I.

56:26.52

Dan

Um.

56:50.98

philjstreet

I Would like to ask this of everyone because for me fun is such and a big part of life. Do you have any funny stories that you could share with us from your time on this planet so far.

56:52.94

Dan

Yeah, it's again just thinking what what I'm willing to share I think oh. I mean I could do some what I think of maybe some work stuff. But I Yeah I have to think a bit more about person about whatever what I'm willing to share. Yeah.

57:51.78

philjstreet

So that's cool. That's cool I am is its ah it's a kind of underlying theme could have to think of a different way to word it? Ah, but in this industry so many things happen. Um, but none of them are really shareable in a public domain. Um, but.

58:05.16

Dan

Um, yeah, then ah I might just thinking I could share some some funny things I've done for my professional experiences and feel free to edit them out if they then not if they're not funny.

58:29.38

philjstreet

But that's also life right stuff happens you just dust yourself down and get on with it.

58:44.40

philjstreet

Um, yeah, yeah, yeah, go for it.

58:39.26

Dan

But just actually what I worked with my my none um, my none restaurant gig was helping chicken soers launch their new qsr which is a now- called chicken shopper and called chicken and I was given full creative license and again I was late I was a complete outsider and. Used to have a lot of fun. We ended up getting cease and desists from Kfc from Nandos from panda express in the us um for sort of copyright for copyright and for just for you sort of playing around with their names just having fun all very polite and we always responded and then I remember once which. I did they I I'd love to say there was a purpose behind this. But I think at that time as well. I was just a lot about making noise and getting controversy. So it was a fried chicken restaurant and I managed to source some chicken feet and then found a nail salon. And got the nail salon I mean it took a lot of searching to paint the nails of the chicken and then put nail jewely on and they got a photographer and did a whole foods photo shoot sort of putting these these these chicken feet in sat in burgers and in fry packs I think it horrified a lot of people including the investors.

::

philjstreet

All right.

::

Dan

Um, but a yeah I don't know if I there was a bit controversy for the sake of it but I was a lot of stuff like that was a lot of fun and so what maybe be line of life makes me laugh I'm going to do.

::

philjstreet

Um, they but I suppose then you have to ask the question is it true. What they say around about all publicity is good publicity. Whatever perception that may be of of that thing.

::

Dan

I've you know I've I've reflect as I said in the beginning I was very much about social media. You've got a pattern interrupt you got to you got to break people's pattern when they're scrolling. It's but as I've gone through it more There is a thing of controversy for the sake of it and I think the more I do my brand work now. It's it's about your values like is this. Is this actually related to anything a higher purpose that we believe in which could be and if it is like innovation or being edgy or challenging perceptions. Fine. You know if it's sharing a value. But if it's just like I see a lot with the fast food brands. You know everyone's like oh so funny. What they're doing on Twitter I'm like yeah I get it. You know. What else are you going to say about a big Mac so you're going to drown people in these memes and gifs and fun stuff. But ultimately these aren't edgy brands. They're not very purpose driven. They're not particularly funny and and then it just feels a bit tacked on and not but miss kind of is always my opinion. But yeah, there is a thing as controversy for the sake of your eyes as of.

::

philjstreet

Yeah, what's your what's your take on using humor in marketing and the reason I asked that is because I properly got Facebook marketed to the other day. It's ah you know I was scrolling as people do and um I got interrupted.

::

Dan

I'll go through more on this journey.

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philjstreet

By It was a soap actually I can't even remember the name of it off the top of my head but it was doctor something and the the advert drew me in like within seconds and the advert is hilarious. It's just it's it's wonderfully hilarious, certainly appealed to my humor. So now in my head I'm I'm feeling like I feel like I want to give this brand a goal because it feels like they have absolutely worked hard on getting this messaging. Ah certainly across in a way that I could relate to. And do you think that humor has its place in marketing.

::

Dan

I'd say you can't these days you can't do marketing without humor and it it depends on the brad of course it depends on the brand if you're a 3 star mission restaurant. You're not gonna be again. You're not goingnna drown people and gifts but people youve got to meet people where they are people go to social media to be.

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philjstreet

Um, really.

::

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

::

Dan

Primarily entertained but also to be educated and inspired and so what they did that they just triggered an emotion on you and so yeah, like e but I'd say if a 3 star mission restaurant is is on social media and especially the Tiktok being the future. You can still have a bit of fun around it like if it's just serious face all the time. It's it's fine, but it's not what people want to go to social media for so you can you can balance it up a bit I know again just from using very good ads partner for for some of the restaurants I've worked with the ones where again because you got not even a second to stop people in their tracks using humor. Those ads where we were really quite outrageous and bold in what we were saying always did far better. So I think in that instance definiteie you you want to grab people's attention Youtuber and just because I just decided to go back as well. I think one of the issues is you have if if there's a line I don't one then let's say you've got the fast food change the fast food chains.

::

philjstreet

Right.

::

Dan

They don't have much purpose. There's not really much substance there and they're just but they're doing. They're smart so they do all this fun stuff and putting all their money into the fun stuff at the other end of the line. You've got let's say the the patagonias of this world or when let's say so let like a food example like silo like ah, a zero like the 0 waste restaurant in London very purposed driven.

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philjstreet

Um, yep.

::

Dan

But so many other restaurants are just in the middle because it's so neutral and they just they're too Scared. It's hard being funny. It takes it's an investment and you need the right person to do it but they won't go the funny route because they're too scared to do that and they won't go the purpose route because they're too scared to do that. So she's. Very neutral in between space and no one goes to no one. No one signs up to a newsletter. No one goes on social media for neutral ultimately by my ship type messages. You know So That's that's the issue So really pick a lane. You know have fun with it. Go purpose driven Ideally a bit of both but being neutral.

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philjstreet

Um, yeah, yeah, yeah.

::

philjstreet

Yeah I mean that makes total sense and I suppose as well. Then that's that's probably the the business slash Founder's own limiting beliefs coming into plays again right? they're they're struggling to take themselves outside of their comfort zone If humor doesn't come naturally to them.

::

Dan

No one wants that.

::

Dan

Is.

::

Dan

Um, yeah.

::

philjstreet

Or the values and they haven't really truly figured out what that is and because sometimes you need help right? to help draw draw that out yourself as to the reason why you do something.

::

Dan

A hundred percent and it's not fit look It's not fair because a lot of operators and founders do this because they wanted to create amazing food and make people happy with that. Not to make videos of themselves dancing on Tiktok but but it is what it is. You know that's. I don't love the whole realels Tiktok thing I'm ah that's not me but I can't fight if I fight that I'll sound like a dinosaur like that is the way the world's going whether I like it or not if I was to launch a brand tomorrow and that's where my customers are but it's like as I've learned myself for the hard way. It's why you know I have an amazing business coach is if you really struggle with it and get help.

::

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

::

philjstreet

Yeah I mean totally and you're applying that in your own business as well, right? So you're kind of I couldn't agree more I think we're as as founders were sometimes a little bit too proud to.

::

Dan

Really rather than just trying to plug on and keep doing the same things that don't get results and.

::

philjstreet

Ask for help to plug the gaps where we don't have the natural skillset because you can't be good at everything right? It's just impossible. Um, yeah, um I want to talk to you about building a tribe because that's something that you you talk a lot around ah in terms of.

::

Dan

Yeah.

::

philjstreet

That's what you're actually looking for. You're looking for people to effectively be part of your tribe in terms of what your your product or service stands for etc again without giving too much away without you know going on a retainer for all of the listeners today. But um, what does that process.

::

Dan

Yeah.

::

Dan

I.

::

philjstreet

Involved How do you? How does people get started in that other than retaining your services of course. Yeah.

::

Dan

So but of course worse a group was a great place to start. But um, you could. Also you can also choose do yourselves and that I'd say for a lot of people even just taking if I'm so busy just take half a day or a day to do the work well give you so much benefit then just blindly rushing forward trying to communicate without doing the work. So the none step is you've got to do the work on your brand who you are who you are who your customers are why they should choose you number None the absolute foundation your substance. What makes you authentic. And I know this's where a lot of brand people roll their eyes this other brand guy charging as 20 grand for this these words that are meaningless but they're not they they they have a lot of meaning but you have to when I work with people as well and this a problem a lot of band agencies will give you sort of None slide on to voice one side on content pillars and your values. For me, it's like you have to be able to will do them but can you demonstrate is every day. How are you demonstrating them and are you willing to do hard uncomfortable things to do them as well because to them to be authentic. You have to do things for your community based on who you are and and they and.

::

philjstreet

Um, yeah.

::

Dan

They can be hard and they can cost take time and they can cost money so the the first step is doing the work on who you are and your substance. The none point this is really my my superpower and speciality is then building a framework for the messages you want to be known for and the story framework. What are the things you're going to talk about because we all know. Frustrations pieces. What I hear every day of staring that blank marketing calendar of what the hell do I do next? What if you had a plan then you know what to do next? Um, sort the None part doing the work. Get your framework get your framework for who you are framework for your message and story and then the next part is. You have to do things for your community and this feels very counterintuitive that it's all those small human touches that really create that community that that really that create the community of that. Ah diehard fans that will stay with you for life and that's what a lot of people overlook and. But it can look It can be small things like getting sharing your journey on Instagram and getting people to interact with new menu items or you know even just making be like get blank just making people smile on on and on a mail or when they sign up to your newsletter or on the booking form. But then other things as well like whether it's things for your community or how you treat your team or just surprising and delighting your customers. You know I've done it I've done events before for um, some of the clients I've worked with and for me there is no higher point of a brand than watching people that love your brand come together to share that passion. You know that those bonds the customers for life and they're going to bring more people in so that is a really key part as well and again and they just keep telling that real human story is is is what's so essential because that's what people are going to connect with and that's when I look at the brands and they. Not many in hospitality to do this but the difference in engagement from the brands that really again run their page like it was their personal page but still a professional bias to it to the others that are just doing neutral is is night and day you know.

::

philjstreet

Right? Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, um, awesome I mean um I think that's pretty much it to be honest, that ah the what? Ah what's what's coming next for you. You mentioned that you've you've got some.

::

Dan

And yeah.

::

philjstreet

But um, what does the rest of:

::

Dan

So yeah, so ass I hope hopefully to make the hire hopefully get a few vegan and alcohol free brands launching my core launching some courses as well for the for the smaller for more startups and smaller independence that I'd be very happy with that I might my dream is to be able to. Go on holiday next year and still make money so that's my kind of business goal which I cannot wish I won't be able to do without a team because I'd just you know as you go through that journey you start thinking again am I just am I keeping repeating the same things or how can I progress and for me I feel that to put the system in place that. Whether it's my team making money or other investments. So. That's that's a rule I think hopefully real is the goal for me next year

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philjstreet

Yeah, no, that sounds like that's absolutely achievable and um I yeah know I Massively appreciate you coming on and sharing your story and some interesting titbits to um to kind of wt the appetite. Um, everything you talked about makes complete sense. Um. If people want to get a hold of you to learn more about what you do and how you might be able to help them.. What's the best method for them to do to do that.

::

Dan

Sure um I'm brand storyd down on Instagram but I'm not super activeive on that anymore. So that Linkedin is probably the best place I just Dan Nash stupid picture of eating a burger and I also have my pattern interrupt obviously and I have my cold brand mail.

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philjstreet

Um, obviously yeah.

::

Dan

Which is a bimonthly mail where I just share inspiration and advice on how to get more love from your customers and you can sign up at http://brandsttories.club for that and I also offer I always have a few free workshops to help people out if what I'm saying is spinning you out. And you want a bit of clarity then send me. Yeah, hit me up and we can do a workshop and give you some clarity.

::

philjstreet

Fantastic! Thanks so much Dan Massively appreciate your time and wish you all the very best with your plan for the for the year ahead and maybe we'll come back and do another chat in a year's time to see how that plan mapped out.

::

Dan

I But I really enjoyed this chat. So I would absolutely love that. Thanks again for having me.

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philjstreet

Fantastic, No problem at all have a good one.